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The Sons of Thunder

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Gods

Majestics

In the world of Sons of Thunder, a lost power has been rediscovered. It is a power greater than magic. The power is called Majestics and allows the user to freeze raging rivers, still earthquakes, and command the heavens, performing godlike deeds. Majestics are spiritual contracts that override the laws of nature. The contracts are made with the Soburin and the Muhandae, a supreme and complex entity that agrees to perform the godlike wonders.

There are four categories in which the powers manifest:

 The Majestics of the Elements, The Majestics of the Mind, The Majestics of Wonders, and The Majestics of Power.

In the Sons of Thunder, selected humans are granted specific Majestics, giving them authority and power over the elements, nature, and plagues.

Here is an excerpt from The Son of Nepal where the hero demonstrates the Majestic of Water for the first time.

 

The riverbanks were mostly hills crowned with an abundance of greenery, and its floors were covered in a sheet of coarse browns from the fallen leaves. He arrived at a clearing on the bank and scanned around for anything that was out of the ordinary. The surging force of the rapids and the midday glare of the sun were all he could see.

But, in that very moment, after all the searching, Johannan witnessed something astounding. It was something he had never heard of or seen before.

He saw a ghostly image of himself pacing to the edge of the river and stamping its foot against the waters. He couldn’t grasp what it meant, so he kept observing. The image started again and continued to do so: walking from where he was, stamping, and then disappearing.

Hours went past, and Johannan continued to watch this image repeating itself. His hair colour hadn’t changed back, which he knew meant the Master was still present. He sat down on the ground, rubbing his forehead. Why doesn’t he show himself? Where could he be?

The sun was beginning to descend when an idea presented itself to Johannan—things were beginning to come together in his head.

The conversation those fishermen were having, and the image. Perhaps they were linked, maybe he should mimic the image.

He got up to his feet and began to shamble closer to the edge of the bank. It displayed threatening surges of thunderous waters. He wondered why he was doing this; it didn’t seem to make sense putting his life at risk—one misplaced step, and the currents could sweep him away. But, it could also mean that the image was an instruction of what he must do next.

Johannan lifted his foot and stamped it against the shallowest part of the river. As soon as it collided with the riverbed, the earth shuddered. The waters detonated, freeing a screeching wind that forged the liquid into two serrated walls of ice. Pema and Rinzen with eyes wide open were silent and petrified.

The mighty rapids were now divided into two parts that exposed a bouldered pathway of secrets all the way to the opposite side of the river. The shimmering walls claimed their dominion further up. The noise of swirling liquids accumulating was like a dying wail as the crackles of forming ice subdued its movement.

 

Visions are a common occurrence among the main characters in The Sons of Thunder. In this scene, Johannan is prompted by a vision of himself to activate the Majestics. The Sons of Thunder is a series of novellas based on different fates—the cords of destiny—that will soon weave together and save the world.

The Son of Nepal

Copyright © J.J Sylvester 2016

The Watchers

Watchers are spirits that inhabit the celestial kingdom of Irdis. They are under the rule of the Soburin and the Muhandae. They occasionally visit Earth to perform their duties.Some watchers have the power to move mountains or travel at light speed, others have access to hidden knowledge. Here are some of the watchers that appear in the series so far:

 

The Congregation of Irdis

These are lower-ranking watchers under the rule and direction of a Monarch Prince.

 

Aneo

Aneo is a watcher under Prince Tanar from the clan of educators. He is six feet tall with sky-blue hair. He is exceedingly wise, speaks concisely, and tends to disappear as soon as the attention is elsewhere, He will also appear unexpectedly. Aneo enjoys cooking and is seen feeding Johannan, Pema, and Rinzen in the wilderness. He makes his first appearance in book one, The Son of Nepal.

 

Eelis

Eelis is a watcher under Prince Tanar from the clan of educators. He is remarkably knowledgeable and is very curious about human beings and their behaviour. Eelis delights in teaching the hidden secrets of the world to Aliqxis. He adores her but believes she acts without thinking. Eelis taught Aliqxis how to read and write. He is thought to be the most down-to-earth of all the watchers in the story so far because of his laughter.

 

 

The Monarch Princes

There are twelve Monarch Princes in The Sons of Thunder. They are the rulers of the Congregation of Irdis and are divided into four divisions: war, strategy, service, and scholar. Some Monarch Princes undergo change when the Muhandae empowers them. This is known as the exalted state.

 

Zion

Zion, of the war division, is the first Prince of Irdis and the most formidable.

Zion is a heavily armed, seven-foot-tall militant warrior on horseback.  He is solely responsible for the destruction of numerous kingdoms. He is, by far, the most feared of the twelve. Most of his adversaries surrender or retreat before battle. Zion makes his first appearance in the second book, Let the Earth Tremble.

 

Mihai

Mihai the mighty, of the war division, is the second prince, and he is the strongest of all the Monarchs Princes. He is a nine-foot-tall giant spirit capable of levelling mountains and parting rivers with his titanic strength. Prince Mihai can take down armies of opposing spirits with just his sword. He makes his first appearance in Let the Earth Tremble.

 

Tivara

Tivara the quick, of the war division, is the third prince and is established as the fastest of all the princes. He is able to cross lands almost instantly and uses speed as a weapon during combat. Prince Tivara makes his first appearance in Let the Earth Tremble, in a confrontation with Poseidon.

 

Sheel

Prince Sheel, of the service division, is the warden and carer of nature. He is a shepherd at heart and cares for nature from the spirit realm, guiding beasts through the voice of instinct. Prince Sheel makes his first appearance in Let the Earth Tremble.

 

 

The Origins

Origins rank higher than the Monarch Princes. There are a total of eight Origins, who protect the world through law. Each Origin represents their own field in higher court cases.

 

Jeemah

Jeemah, the Origin of War, is one of the deadliest warriors in the entire universe. He possesses a fighting prowess much superior to all the Monarch Princes. He is the guardian of the secret knowledge of destruction. In the highest courts of the universe, he has gained the upper hand in the case against Teki, the Origin of Evil, who petitioned to disclose the secret knowledge of advanced weaponry in the form of explosives to mankind in early history. Jeemah fears that if the knowledge is revealed too soon, mankind will destroy itself before fulfilling its potential. Jeemah makes his first appearance in The Son of Nepal.

 

Bijali

Bijali, the Magistrate of Disaster, is the protector of Earth against natural disasters. Bijali has defeated Teki’s numerous petitions to wipe parts of the world with natural disasters. The cases in which he was defeated by Teki have brought about hurricanes, tsunamis, volcanoes, and earthquakes. Bijali makes his first appearance in Let the Earth Tremble.

 

Bentara

Bentara, the Origin of Life, is responsible for life on Earth and has won many cases against Teki, preventing disease and plague. Bentara makes his first appearance in Let the Earth Tremble.

 

 

The Chief Announcers

The Chief Announcers are the highest-ranking watchers in The Sons of Thunder.

 

 Vestnesis

Vestnesis always appears before judgment. He is also a Judge. He makes his appearance twice in The Son of Nepal—but only once is his appearance made obvious.

Copyright © J.J Sylvester 2016

Prequel-The Son of Nepal-Ayushi 1445

Ayushi at 17

The sun was at its zenith in the great land of Nepal. It was a hot day. The crying of a young child carried across the plains of nature, and the heavens shrilled as it took notice of the blind child and of the brother and his sister, who carried her.

“Leave her here, someone will find her,” said the young man .

“What if no one does? Most people don’t want her—she’s a girl and she’s blind ,” said his sister, shading her eyes. “She really needs us. She could die out here in the hot sun. Doesn’t this bother you?”

“Of course it does, but she will die if we take her back. We have tried everyone, and no one wants her. Let’s leave her under this tree, she will be alright.”

“Will she?” The girl dropped her gaze as the air of disappointment surrounded her.

“We cannot keep her; we are not her parents. It’s just another mouth to feed, and father will not be happy if we return with her.”

His sister lowered the crying child under the shade of the tree. “She’s beautiful,” she said, admiring the child, who extended her hands to be picked up. The girl stood straight, covering her racing heart with her hands. “She loves us.”
Her brother sighed, “Come on, let’s go. You will get us into trouble if you let yourself get too attached.” He turned to walk away.

“Wait!” said his sister, holding out her hand. “I just want to say goodbye to little Ayushi.”

His head jerked back in a knock of surprise. “You what?” he said, raising his voice. “You gave her a name! Your name, why?” He covered his mouth and dipped his head slightly. “Never mind, just say your goodbyes and let’s go. This is a sure sign we are going to get into trouble if we aren’t already. I have to go and help father with his work, and you don’t want to be the reason for me being late again.”

Years of hard labour in the fields with her father had made her a stranger to tears, but her eyes welled up as the little girl giggled. “Goodbye, little Ayushi,” she sobbed. “May the heavens take good care of you, and may you fulfil your destiny.” She turned with her head bowed and ambled away.

“Take me, take me,” said the child stretching her hand to be hoisted up.

The girl stopped. There was evidence of her thoughts wrestling against her as she attempted to turn around. She dipped her head and a whimper escaped her lips.
There was a formidable conflict within her, a moment where she wanted to take the child and run away, but she knew that wouldn’t end well. She had seen it all happen before. This was the type of inner struggle that gave hope, that made her believe if there was a one-in-a-million chance it would work out, she could take the chance and succeed—

“Come on!” shouted her brother. Sensing his agitation, the inner battle was won and the victor decided. She left the child under the tree to join him.

The child remained there for hours. She called for Ayushi , but there was no response, just the echo of the wilderness throwing her words back at her. Her voice became brittle and hoarse, and she cried. She was hungry, it was a pain that Ayushi made sure she had never felt, but Ayushi was gone, and it was only a matter of time before it got worse.

A cool gale descended from the mountains and blew against the child, and it began to drizzle. She wrapped her arms around herself as she felt the droplets of water settling against the sides of her face. She knew from the sound of her surroundings that the voices of people and those that could take care of her were far away. She sobbed, a feeling of rejection formed into a discomfort in her throat. She didn’t know, the feeling was called rejection, because no one had taught her how to identify this emotion she had come to hate . All she understood, instinctively, was that Ayushi could make that feeling go away.

The loud hiss of clattering trees induced a panic, her heart pounded. The wind was climbing in strength. She shivered.

A warm hand reached from out of nowhere and wiped away her tears. Being blind meant she was remarkably sensitive to the sounds around her. She would hear the footsteps of smaller animals, sounds that would have escaped those with sight. But she hadn’t heard anyone approach her.

“Ayushi!” she cried out, sobbing in relief. She stretched out her hands to be hoisted up, and a hold not quite what she expected reached out to receive her grip. She intuited the potential of great strength within the hands. It had to be the hands of a man, but he held her gently, the way Ayushi would. She felt relief and peace, sensations she treasured. Feelings were her way of seeing the world, and right at that moment it was a beautiful view.

As soon as the man lifted her, the winds behaved quite peculiarly. A small population of Himalayan monals flapped their wings in protest, as the flow of the gale suddenly came to a stop and altered its course to blow constantly in another direction. The grass, the trees, and the shrubs were bending and pointing the same way. There was a honeyed scent of rose oils gently distributed by the wind. The man lifted his nose to the heavens to inhale the aroma.

“Ahh, the heavens rejoice. He is revealing the way,” said a deep voice. It was profound and powerful, but the child sensed comfort and benevolence in its sound that most children would have missed, and it brought a feeling of safety. Normally when she heard such a tone, it meant that she wouldn’t go hungry or grow cold from being left outside.

“Here, little one, you must eat,” said the man. He fed her broken pieces of paratha, the same type of bread Ayushi made and gave to her when she was cooking during the day. “Drink now,” he said as he gave her some water that he carried in water skins. He lifted his head to observe the direction of the wind.

“The heavens have set us on a path,” he said, then wrapped a blanket around her. “You have a great destiny ahead of you, young one.”
He lifted her into a basket of beans that he carried strapped onto his back. It felt more comfortable than the hard surface under the tree. She was right—it was the voice of kindness and comfort. The lump in her throat was subsiding. It was a welcomed sensation.

“Do you have a name, child?”

For a moment she couldn’t think of how to respond, she had never been called a name before today, but Ayushi had called her by her own name before she departed.

“Ayushi,” she replied. She wasn’t sure if the man would accept this as her name, seeing that it belonged to someone else. She waited for a sound that would give her an idea on how he felt about this.

“Ahh, what a splendid name,” he said.

She smiled, his voice was reassuring, she couldn’t detect the tone of fear she normally could perceive in Ayushi’s words. Usually, fear started out as a low tone she could just about hear, but after a while it would grow louder, which meant she would soon be stripped of the comfort she was experiencing.

“I shall take good care of you, little Ayushi. We must deliver you to the destiny that awaits you. The heavens have a purpose for you, and it must be urgently fulfilled.”

The constant gale blew, and the basket rocked as the man ambled across the alpine meadow. The man journeyed nonstop, and after some time, Ayushi fell asleep. An evening rain descended from the mountains onto the lower lands of Nepal. As the shrilling gusts continued to thrust, little Ayushi sat in the basket under the covering and secrecy of his wide sedge hat. The waters trickled down the hat and poured onto the ground. Apart from the odd raindrop that would hit her on the cheek, she was completely dry. The man hummed a guttural tone she found soothing. She was finally safe and moving towards her fate.

Find out Ayushi’s fate

 

Copyright © J.J Sylvester 2016

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